THE CIA used alleged psychics to find aliens on Mars and learn about life on the Red Planet one million years ago.

The world’s most powerful spy agency now openly admits the programme existed and worked with people who claimed to have supernatural powers.

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The $20m project became known as ‘Stargate’ and was set up because the US believed the Soviet Union was investing heavily in similar research.

Initially, in a bid to read the minds of enemies, a secret army unit based at Fort Meade in Maryland investigated “extra sensory perception”.

The agency worked with people who claimed to have “remote viewing” powers meaning they can ‘see’ areas and people in different locations without actually being there.

One of the most fascinating experiments took place on May 22, 1984 and was called simply Mars Exploration.

According to the CIA’s own documents, the unnamed psychic described “The planet Mars. Time of interest approximately 1 million years B.C.”

Scientists believe that life could have existed on the planet millions of years ago, which may explain why the US government wanted “data” from this time period.

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The alleged psychic said he could to see “huge” pyramids, an obelisk structure, and road networks on the Red Planet.

He then described a number of shelters visible on the surface of Mars.

The man said: “Different chambers…but they’re almost stripped of any kind of furnishings or anything.

“It’s like ah…strictly [a] functional place for sleeping or that’s not a good word, hibernations, some form.

“I can’t, I get real raw inputs, storms, savage storm and sleeping through storms.”

Asked by a CIA agent who would sleep through the storms, the man claimed to be able to make out an alien race.

“Ah very tall, very large people but they’re very thin,” he said.

“They’re ancient people. They’re dying. It’s past their time or age.”

‘ANCIENT MARTIANS’

On the CIA’s own website, a Q&A was published last month outlining the programme.

Before the research moved to Fort Meade in the latter part of the decade, the project began in 1972 at Stanford Research Institute (SRI) in California.

The agency, at the request of Congress, declassified the project’s records and later published all the records online.

Details about the secret project had been leaked to the media since the 1980s.

Army veteran Joseph McMoneagle claims that remote viewers, such as himself, were used to track down hostages taken by terror groups and hunt US fugitives.

McMoneagle told the Washington Post that he was involved in 450 missions between 1978 and 1984.

He says he helped the military locate hostages in Iran and also detected a tiny radio hidden in the calculator of a suspected Russian spy in South Africa.

The alleged remote viewer admitted the practice is not always accurate saying: “Ninety-eight percent of the people are kooks.”

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Uri Geller, celebrity psychic and famed spoon bender from Israel, was also studied as part of the project.

During these experiments, Geller sat in a sealed and monitored room where he was asked to draw words and objects using his psychic powers.

In one of the tests, a word was selected at random from a dictionary.

The first word selected was “fuse”. A firecracker was then drawn by someone outside the locked room.

Geller was told via intercom the drawing was finished after the picture had been taped to the wall outside.

The CIA documents say: “His almost immediate response was that he saw a ‘cylinder with noise coming out of it’.

“His drawing to correspond with it was a drum, along with a number of cylindrical-looking objects.”

The second word chosen was “bunch” and a scientist drew a bunch of grapes.

The documents continue: “He then talked about ‘purple circles’.

“Finally, he said that he was quite sure that he had the picture. His drawing was indeed a bunch of grapes.”

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The researchers concluded Uri “demonstrated his paranormal perceptual ability in a convincing and unambiguous manner”.

The CIA said it ended the programme in 1977 and handed it over to the Defense intelligence Agency (DIA) where it was eventually renamed with the codename GRILL FLAME.

By the mid-1990s, the DIA handed the project back to the CIA prompting the spy agency to fund an independent study group to assess the findings.

Four researchers from the American Institute for Research published their findings in 1995.

Speaking about the report, the CIA wrote: “That report’s conclusion—which echoed the assessments of the CIA officers involved in the program during the 1970s was that enough accurate remote viewing experiences existed to defy randomness, but that the phenomenon was too unreliable, inconsistent, and sporadic to be useful for intelligence purposes.

“We decided not to restore the program.”

The Stargate programme was the subject of a book by British author Jon Ronson which inspired the 2009 film The Men Who Stare At Goats starring George Clooney and Ewan McGregor.

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