Article by Anna Savva                                August 5, 2020                                  (dailystar.co.uk)

• Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the ‘first man on the Moon’, would have been 90 this August 5th. He died in 2012. His son, Mark Armstrong, 57 (pictured above), is a Silicon Valley software engineer. Mark says that while his famous father didn’t admit to believing in God – he did believe in alien life forms.

• Mark Armstrong was six-years old in the summer of 1969 when he and his family went to Cape Canaveral, Florida to watch his father’s rocket launch toward the Moon. The family then went back to their Houston, Texas home to watch the rest of the Apollo 11 mission, culminating with the Moon landing on July 20.

• Interviewed last year to mark the 50th anniversary of the Moon landing, Mark Armstrong said that his dad “had a wonderful spirit with a great sense of humor.” But he was a an engineer and scientist first. “Whatever religious beliefs he had he kept very close to the vest throughout his life.” “A lot of astronauts claim to have had a spiritual experience (in space),” said Mark. “[T]hat was not true of my father.”

• Mark once heard someone ask his father if he believed in extraterrestrial life. Neil’s response was “it would be arrogant not to”. As Mark puts it, “The universe is unimaginably vast and we know so little about it that his (father’s) belief was, statistically speaking, the chances were overwhelmingly high that we are not the only life in the universe.”

• The Apollo lunar flights ended in 1972 and were an inspiration to the world. Mark is very proud of this. But the Moon has remained of great interest to NASA and scientists. A new generation of space exploration has begun with missions to Mars and another lunar landing, this time at the Moon’s South Pole by 2024. “The human spirit was uplifted by the Apollo program,” says Mark. “It inspired a generation of people to want to be work harder because they believed something good could happen in their future if they prepared themselves.”

• Mark notes that, while a global hero, his father was very humble and ‘down to Earth’. “My dad often said that he was ‘born at the right time’ to put himself in the candidate pool for Gemini and Apollo.” “[I]t’s difficult to imagine the pressures that he was under without actually being in his shoes.”

[Editor’s Note]   I’ve always felt sorry for Neil Armstrong. With all of his accomplishments that culminated in being an Apollo astronaut, in the end he would just be used as a propaganda tool for the deep state. When he saw the alien craft hovering at the crater’s edge during his Apollo 11 Moon landing, had he been read into the truth?  i.e: the military-industrial-complex’s ongoing interaction with various alien species including Draco Reptilians and the Nazi space fleet; the Navy’s development of electromagnetic warp drive technology during the 1960s (provided by extraterrestrials), allowing it to build its own secret space program, ‘Solar Warden’; the Air Force’s separate development of advanced alien technology to create its own separate secret space program; the Illuminati-owned corporate conglomerate; and NASA’s own secret space program.

I feel that Armstrong was an unsuspecting player in the public relations campaign called the NASA Apollo program, complete with backup “Moon” footage shot by Stanley Kubrick (as a Plan B just in case the mission went south). The public NASA missions, using known rocket technology, were devised to keep the various other advanced space programs top secret. By his astonishment at seeing the alien craft on the Moon over his restricted radio transmissions to Houston, it is apparent that Armstrong wasn’t aware of the reality of the situation. Of course, there was a possibility that these astronauts wouldn’t survive. So why bother to read them into the big picture until after the mission? it is most likely that the deep state authorities didn’t debrief the Apollo astronauts until after they had returned with a whole lot of questions.

When Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins were finally told about the alien presence on the Moon and everywhere else, and the development of advanced secret space programs, they were also told that they would put them and their families in dire jeopardy if they told anyone about this top secret reality. Thus, rather than proudly exemplifying the role of ‘the first man on the Moon’ as a hero to the world, Armstrong retired to live a secluded life away from the media and the public – in constant fear for his and his family’s safety because of what he knew. He seemed to have gotten more comfortable with covering up the truth in his later years.

In the ‘Good Morning Britain’ interview below (promoting the movie “Armstrong”), Mark Armstrong states that, although “the world wanted (Neil) to be ‘different’” (i.e.: a more gregarious hero figure), “he wanted to be the same, and he wanted (his) family dynamics to stay the same. That was just the kind of guy that he was.” Mark attributes his dad’s life-long agoraphobia to his private personality. It seems that Mark is trying hard to rewrite his father’s history. Or is this a push for a more public-friendly version of Neil Armstrong, with the posthumous release of movies such as “Armstrong” and “First Man”, meant to abate the widespread suspicion that his strange behavior was due to being freaked out by seeing alien UFOs on the Moon and being threatened by the deep state?

 

Legendary NASA astronaut Neil Armstrong believed in alien life, his son has revealed.

Mark Armstrong, a Silicon Valley software engineer, was just six-years-old when his dad changed the course of history with his “giant leap for mankind.”

It was during the summer of 1969, and the Armstrong clan went to Florida for the launch at Cape Canaveral and back to to their Houston home to watch the rest of the mission and the all important touchdown on July 20.

First man on the Moon Armstrong died in 2012.

Were he alive today he would be marking his 90th birthday on August 5 – but his legacy lives on.

Reflecting on his dad’s achievements, Mark, 57, said despite Armstrong touching the heavens in the historic Apollo 11 mission, he didn’t admit to believing in God – but he did believe in alien life forms.

Speaking from his home in Cincinnati, Ohio, to mark the 50th anniversary of the Moon landings last year, he said: “A lot of astronauts claim to have had a spiritual experience, that was not true of my father.

“My dad was an engineer and scientist first and foremost but had a wonderful spirit with a great sense of humour.

“Whatever religious beliefs he had he kept very close to the vest throughout his life.

“There have been a lot of claims from different religions about his converting to their religion, but none of that is true.

“But I once heard someone ask him if he believed in extraterrestrial life and his response was ‘it would be arrogant not to’.”

He continued: “The universe is unimaginably vast and we know so little about it that his belief was, statistically speaking, the chances were overwhelmingly high that we are not the only life in the universe.”

 
7:33 minute video interview of Mark Armstrong in 2019 (‘Good Morning Britain’ YouTube)

This content was originally published here.